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MAKING MUSIC WITH DYNOMAN

ANUSHA BAWANY CHATS WITH MUSIC MAN HAAMID RAHIM ABOUT THE BIRTH OF HIS STAGE NAME, DYNOMAN, PLAYING AT INTERNATIONAL FESTIVALS AND GROWING UP TO THE RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS

Where did the name Dynoman come from? What is its significance?
It’s actually a funny story! I had gone to visit a friend of mine and his brother said I looked like a dinosaur, so that always stuck out to me. When I decided to choose a moniker, I wanted to call myself Dinosaurman, or something around those lines. After thinking about it for a bit, I then came up with Dynoman.

When did you realize you had a passion for music?
Around the 7th grade when I began actively trying to learn how to play the guitar (as apposed to pretending to play guitar on my tennis racquet). Music has always been a part of my life. My father brought me up listening to various different classic rock artists, and as I grew older I began to explore different genres.

What makes electronic music stand out from other music genres?
Personally I am a fan of many different genres of music. I listen to everything from hip-hop, experimental, ambient, beats, rock and alternative, just to name a few. I don’t think that electronic music stands out from other genres, but I feel that I just understand it better than others, which is why I am able to make it. For me, electronic music has very few boundaries, and your sound can grow exponentially, as I have seen in my own work over the years.

What kind of music did you listen to growing up? Who are your musical influences?
I listened to lots of classic rock growing up and then went through a grunge/alternate phase in the 6th grade. Most of my teens I spent listening to the Red Hot Chili Peppers and John Frusciante (who is my biggest musical influence). My inspiration/influence that I direct into my work comes from various different places too. As for why I got into music, I would credit that to John Frusciante and Jimi Hendrix. Both were my main inspirations behind learning the guitar. As for these days though, I am gaining my musical influence and inspiration from what is happening around me here in Karachi and South Asia. We have amazing music coming out from this side of the world, and hearing tracks from people such as Tollcrane, Nawksh Delivery Serivce, Alak, Rudoh, and Ali Suhail(to name a few from our local scene) is really influencing my work these days.

If you could work with three musicians, living or dead, who would they be?
Lou Reed, John Frusciante and Aphex Twin

What do you consider to be your career highs?
I feel that my artistic career is ever evolving, but a few special memories that I have taken away would have to be playing at Worldtronics 2013 in Berlin, Pettah Interchange 2014 in Colombo and at FXS:Hi Tea 2014 in Karachi. Also, the feeling after releasing my album,Naubahar, in 2012 was pretty amazing.

Your most memorable performance?
Pettah Interchange 2014, Colombo.

How has social media impacted your career?
It has been great for my career. I am able to tell the people who want to listen to my work that my work is out, and it’s easy for them to connect with me too.

You’re the co-founder of an Internet music label called Forever South. What inspired you to start this? Tell us a little about the label.
Forever South is a label/collective Bilal Nasir Khan AKA Rudoh, and I started in the summer of 2012. There is lots of electronic music out there in Karachi and we felt that we would get a label going to release tracks by all the different artists. We are promoting a culture with FXS as well. Loads of like-minded people like to hear, share and like our music, and come out to our shows to support us. It’s great to see this evolve and be a part of this.

How have your family and friends reacted to your career?
Everyone I know has been majorly supportive of my work. I have a great support system and the best parents, so it keeps me going.

Any upcoming tours or shows planned for 2014?
Yes! We have lots planned. There are talks for something big that FXS will be bringing to Karachi around the beginning of October, and we have shows planned for November and December as well. My album is launching soon so I might take that our tour!

What are the best and worst parts of being a DJ?
I’m more of an electronic music producer and these days have been doing live sets, not DJ ones. But for the DJ sets that I have done in the past, I guess the hardest thing I have encountered in Karachi was to make the crowd less shy so they could get into it and do what they have to do.

How do you prepare for a tour or show?
Practice, rest and just remember to enjoy the ride.

How do you decide what to play at a show?
I play live sets, so I mainly perform original music, and at times mix it into tracks that are made by people from the FXS roster. There is no real criteria but I perform my tracks differently depending on the vibe of the gig. As for DJ’ing, I chose some of my favourite dance tracks that I’m jamming out to and serve them to the crowd to see how they feel.

What’s the funniest thing a fan has done or said to you?
I was once called Donnyman and I found that pretty funny.

What’s your favorite kind of crowd at a show?
Open minded people.

Besides music, what are your other passions?
I like anime, reading, art, football and cricket amongst others.

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